Handling a dox threat

This article isn’t like the ones we typically write. Instead, this is a basic guide into handling a dox threat, as well as handling the situation after a dox. My platform, and myself, aren’t new to this. In 2017, while facing a three year smear campaign, I had been doxxed, alongside my family. Needless to say, I have had plenty of time to prepare for another round.

Initial threat

If you have never been through something like this before, the mere threat of being doxxed can be a very serious element to contend to. Having your information made publically available, without your consent, not only places you in potential danger, but those around you as well.

Rather or not the dox happened, you must remain calm. Remember, if you go into a panic, you aren’t able to think clearly and therefore miss potential evidence.

Collect Evidence

Always keep a record of the evidence. The more you have, the easier it is to prove. If the would-be doxxer is broadcasting his intentions, screencap it. The same goes if they are bragging about past doxxings. Remember, doxxing can be a felony, it can have added charges such as stalking, and you cannot afford to not have enough evidence.

Find Support

In most cases, pertaining doxxing, the individual has a history of the behavior. With that in mind, finding former victims, who have been threatened or doxxed, may be critical. The reason for this is it demonstrates a past behavior. In the law enforcement field, the past behaviors will often dictate those of the future.

Centralize

As you collect evidence, especially from other victims, find a way to centralize it. By having it in one location, law enforcement is able to get to it mich more quickly. In the case of Vincent Nicotra, we have a gallery for this very purpose.

Statements

This is especially essential when reporting it to law enforcement, links provided below. Having a written, or typed, statement will allow you to summarize without the pressure. If going to the police with a prewritten statement, always be sure to sign the end of it.

Reporting

In cases to which there are multiple victims, this maybe a challenge. When reporting, and using other victim names, try to be accurate. If you do not know their real names, try using an alias they are known by. For example:

Youtuber: John Doe

Though it isn’t their actual name, it does give law enforcement a means of contacting the individual. So who do you report these crimes to?

First off, you want to start with your local law enforcement agency, this begins the legal trail. If all they can do is take a report, that’s fine, don’t be discouraged, you are making a trail that dhows you have reported the situation. Now, once you do this, you may file an ic3 report.

An ic3 report, as it’s commonly called, is the cybercrime division of the FBI. By this point, you would had hopefully collected the evidence needed, should they ask for it. However, it never hurts to mention, within your report, other victims, centralized evidence location (if applicable,) and any information you may know regarding the doxxer.

FBI ic3 complaint form

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